Photos: Construction starts for N.Y. Citywide Ferry landings

Construction started Jan. 25 on the New York Citywide Ferry system’s Rockaway landing, where starting in summer 2017 residents of the city’s far-flung seaside community can catch a boat to commute to Manhattan.

James Patchett, the new president and CEO of the city Economic Development Corporation, and a team from landings contractor Skanska USA hosted news media at the installation start. A first piling for the landing’s floating dock was signed by Patchett and others before being driven into the bay at Beach 108th Street and Beach Channel Drive.

A signed piling for the Citywide Ferry Rockaway Landing. NYEDC photo.

A signed piling for the Citywide Ferry Rockaway Landing. NYEDC photo.

The standardized landings will be 90’x35’ and have ticket machines, canopies and wind screens for sheltering waiting passengers. In the Rockaways, the public ferry system will include shuttle bus service to carry riders from neighborhoods .

Officials gather around a piling at the Rockaway landing installation. NYEDC photo.

Officials gather around a piling at the Rockaway landing installation. NYEDC photo.

Ferry fares of $2.75 one way will be the same as city subways and buses, but the Rockaways service offers a direct route from the far eastern shores of Queens. It will be the longest of six planned routes, with a travel time of 59 minutes between Rockaway and lower Manhattan.

A rendering of the New York Citywide Ferry's Rockaway Landing.

A rendering of the New York Citywide Ferry’s Rockaway Landing.

About the author

Kirk Moore

Associate Editor Kirk Moore was a reporter for the Asbury Park Press for over 30 years before joining WorkBoat in 2015. He wrote several award-winning stories on marine, environmental, coastal and military issues that helped drive federal and state government policy changes. He has also been a field editor for WorkBoat’s sister publication, National Fisherman, for almost 25 years. Moore was awarded the Online News Association 2011 Knight Award for Public Service for the “Barnegat Bay Under Stress,” 2010 series that led to the New Jersey state government’s restoration plan. He lives in West Creek, N.J.

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