David KrapfDavid Krapf
David Krapf has been editor in chief of WorkBoat, the nation’s leading trade magazine for the inland and coastal waterways industry, since 1999. He is responsible for overseeing the editorial direction of the publication. Krapf has been in the publishing industry since 1987, beginning as a reporter and editor with daily and weekly newspapers in the Houston area. He also was the editor of a transportation industry daily in New Orleans before joining WorkBoat as contributing editor in 1992. He has been covering the transportation industry since 1989. He has a degree in business administration from the State University of New York at Oswego, and also studied journalism at the University of Houston.

Blog Activity

Fighting fatigue

Fatigue, cellphones, top NTSB chairman's concerns. The workboat industry and other commercial transport modes are a round-the-clock business. Unfortunately, people aren’t built that way. “The basic disconnect of fatigue is fairly simple. Most commercial transportation is 24/7, and humans aren’t,” said Christopher Hart, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board. NTSB Chair Christopher Hart. David Krapf photo.Hart, who addressed the Passenger Vessel Association annual meeting...

As oil busts, passenger vessels boom

As low oil prices continue to hammer the energy sector, passenger vessel operators are looking forward to another good year. At this time last year, on the eve of the annual Passenger Vessel Association convention, the energy sector was mired in bad news while passenger vessel operators were faring much better. Now, the energy market has eroded further, with oil dipping below $27 bbl. today for the first time since 2003. The price of oil has fallen over 25% this year. As oil prices...

Plenty of 'energy' at the WorkBoat Show

The WorkBoat Show proved that the industry is not just about the offshore energy sector. With the severe slump in oil prices continuing to bring down one of the major sectors of our industry, I didn’t think that the International WorkBoat Show held earlier this month would be the best ever. It wasn’t. But it was far from the worst, and topped many people’s expectations. Several exhibitors, among them a Gulf shipyard, told me that it was a great show for their company, perhaps the best...

It’s show time for workboats

To be prepared for the next offshore upturn, companies will still need to be aware of the industry’s latest products and services that will be on display at this year’s WorkBoat Show. It’s hard to believe, but in two weeks another International WorkBoat Show will open in New Orleans. The 36th installment of the show kicks off on Tuesday, Dec. 1 and runs through Thursday, Dec. 3. It is another chance for the industry to show their stuff in the form of the latest products and...

The workboat market has 'energy'

The workboat market is more than just oil and gas. You don’t have to look very hard to find bad news emanating from the energy sector, where oil and gas and offshore service companies have been suffering for well over a year now. Our November issue that is due out later this month is chock full of dreary reports from this beaten-down sector. Our cover story is all about Shell’s Arctic adventure that finally ended with the company announcing last month that it was suspending operations...

Still building on the Gulf Coast

It’s not all about oil and gas on the Gulf Coast, as some yards are proving. You’re probably aware that the oil price drop has had a big effect on several parts of the workboat industry. The biggest impact has been on offshore service vessel and rig operators. You could say the next biggest impact has been on Gulf Coast shipyards with strong ties to the energy sector. As Ken Hocke reports in WorkBoat’s October cover story that will hit the streets soon, some...

Shipper support was key to OPA ’90’s success

Shippers and barge operators have embraced OPA '90 and double hulls. When industry says a law or regulation has been good for business, I become very suspect. But with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, that appears to be the case. Shippers and barge operators have embraced the law and statistics show a big drop in oil spills in the 25 years since its enactment. In our September cover story due out later this month, Associate Editor Kirk Moore takes a look back...

Better customer service for mariners

Will mariners see better service from the NMC? For mariners that have been frustrated with dealing with the Coast Guard’s National Maritime Center (NMC) for their credentials, there is hope. The NMC is testing a real-time, person-to-person service for mariners. As Dale DuPont reported in the August issue of WorkBoat that just hit the streets, the NMC began live online chat beta testing for mariners to talk directly to customer service agents on July 1. The...

Look beyond offshore for good news

At this time last year, OSV contracts had slowed, but offshore-related newbuild and repair work were still fairly steady. That started to change a few months later. At this time last year, new OSV construction contracts had finally slowed, but yards still had some OSV backlogs and repair work was also fairly steady. That started to change a few months later. The offshore market is suffering, mainly a result of low oil prices that closed just above $50 bbl....

Since Deepwater Horizon, it’s all about safety

It may never be totally safe to drill in the deepwater Gulf, but it’s clear that E&P companies want offshore service contractors who have strong safety cultures. It’s been over five years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster, and in the immediate aftermath there were calls to make it safer to drill and make sure that a similar disaster would be prevented in the future. It may never be totally safe to drill in the deepwater Gulf, but it’s clear that E&P companies want offshore...