Pamela GlassPamela Glass
Pamela Glass is the Washington, D.C., correspondent for WorkBoat. She reports on the decisions and deliberations of congressional committees and federal agencies that affect the maritime industry, including the Coast Guard, U.S. Maritime Administration and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Prior to coming to WorkBoat, she covered coastal, oceans and maritime industry news for 15 years for newspapers in coastal areas of Massachusetts and Michigan for Ottaway News Service, a division of the Dow Jones Company. She began her newspaper career at the New Bedford (Mass.) Standard-Times. A native of Massachusetts, she is a 1978 graduate of Wesleyan University (Conn.). She currently resides in Potomac, Md.

Blog Activity

Political fight dooms waterway funding — for now

It was supposed to be smooth sailing for an appropriations bill that would have funded inland waterway improvements, but its fate is now uncertain. It was looking like the waterways industry was ready to score a big victory on Capitol Hill Wednesday with passage of an appropriations bill that included record spending for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which oversees the nation’s inland waterways. And then politics got in the way. Late Wednesday night, the 2017 Energy and Water...

'Barge' film hits iTunes

Life on a barge may be slow, but this documentary is anything but. If you missed the film “Barge” at an independent movie theater last year or at the WorkBoat Maintenance & Repair Conference and Expo in April, you’ll soon be able to watch it on your smartphone or tablet. May 31 is the launch date for the digital version of the film on iTunes. "We're really thrilled that members of the workboat community and industry nationwide will now have the opportunity to enjoy the film,” Ben...

Everything old is old again

New maritime training ships are desperately needed — but this is not a new dilemma. My 1979 story on the Massachusetts Maritime Academy summer training cruise. Pamela Glass photo.I was cleaning out some old files the other day and came across a real gem: One of the first stories I ever wrote as a young reporter for the daily newspaper in New Bedford, Mass. The date: Sept. 16, 1979. The topic: The annual summer training cruise for cadets at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Not...

Will US ports and waterways benefit from Panama Canal expansion?

The answer could be yes — assuming U.S. waterways infrastructure can keep pace with changing demand. A worker on the Panama Canal expansion looks out over construction. Panama Canal Authority photo.Almost two years overdue from its projected opening date, the Panama Canal is now scheduled to open its enlarged locks and usher through some of the world's largest container ships beginning in June. This will be one of the most anticipated, studied and hyped events in global shipping and...

Home is where the shipping container is

Shipping containers aren't just for cargo anymore. Feeling cramped in your vessel's sleeping quarters? How about living in a shipping container? Repurposed containers have become the hot trend in housing, ranging from basic, affordable one-room guest "cottages" to sophisticated designer homes created by top-flight architects. Repurposed sea containers have been around for a long time, often used as a cheap housing alternative in poor countries or as temporary housing for asylum seekers...

More alarms sounded on cyber risks to maritime sector

Report shows new angle on maritime cyberthreats.  Yet another report has signaled the vulnerabilities of the shipping industry to cyberattacks. Released Feb. 19, this new threat analysis comes from Dell SecureWorks Counter Threat Unit, which tracks so-called banking botnets — the huge networks of infected computers that steal bank logins and empty the checking accounts of unsuspecting victims. In 2015, the report says, the most harmful viruses expanded from their traditional...

How well do you know your stars?

Fear of cyberattacks helps revive celestial navigation. The maritime community is justifiably nervous about the potent punch that hackers could deliver by breaking into the company computer or tangling up the world’s GPS. Earlier this month, the Coast Guard reported the latest cyberscare – that a U.S. port had experienced numerous attempts by an unauthorized source to infiltrate its website. In late November and early December, it had observed 432 attempts – all unsuccessful – to...

Doubts grow about Atlantic offshore drilling

Oil and gas exploration off the Atlantic coast is no longer a sure thing. A few years ago, oil and gas exploration off the Atlantic coast seemed like a sure thing, with businesses, local politicians and governors of key southern coastal states lining up in support. Not anymore. According to an article published Dec. 21 in the Washington Post, the tide has turned, as the price of oil has plummeted, the Deepwater Horizon accident blackened beaches in the Gulf of Mexico region, and new...

Education an annual theme at the WorkBoat Show

Heavy burdens of regulation and compliance face this industry — and education is a big part of the show. Every year more than 1,000 exhibitors and several thousand attendees gather for the annual International WorkBoat Show in New Orleans, with the goal of promoting their businesses, networking and also having a little fun in the Big Easy. For us at the magazine, it’s a time to take stock of the industry we cover, peek at emerging technologies and innovations, and understand what...

Bill seeks to shore up port cybersecurity risks

A new bill addressing port cybersecurity may not go far enough. A few weeks ago, I blogged about a congressional hearing at which port leaders said there were significant cybersecurity vulnerabilities at U.S. ports, and they worried that many cyber attacks were going unreported. Now there’s a bill in Congress that would address some of these shortcomings and improve coordination and information sharing about cyber threats in the nation’s ports. Such threats could include hacking,...