Kirk MooreKirk Moore
Associate Editor Kirk Moore was a reporter for the Asbury Park Press for over 30 years before joining WorkBoat in 2015. He wrote several award-winning stories on marine, environmental, coastal and military issues that helped drive federal and state government policy changes. He has also been a field editor for WorkBoat’s sister publication, National Fisherman, for almost 25 years. Moore was awarded the Online News Association 2011 Knight Award for Public Service for the “Barnegat Bay Under Stress,” 2010 series that led to the New Jersey state government’s restoration plan. He lives in West Creek, N.J.

Blog Activity

Blog Activity

Secrets of success from Bouchard

SUNY Maritime graduates get lessons — and an entreaty — from Morton Bouchard III. Before State University of New York Maritime College cadets had their midwinter graduation Jan. 29, some of them had trained on the Bouchard Tug and Barge Simulation Center – a $750,000 virtual tugboat, tucked into one of the old gun casements of Fort Schuyler. Morton Bouchard III speaks at SUNY Maritime graduation on Jan. 29, 2016. Kirk Moore photo.At graduation, they heard Morton Bouchard III,...

Another storm, and more cries for sand

Blizzard a reminder that there is much East Coast dredging and shore protection work to be done after Hurricane Sandy. The tide had finally pulled back Monday, and the storm drains did their job, clearing the way for New Jersey state officials to stand for the cameras and again call for the federal government to put more sand on the beaches.  On the northern reach of the state’s coast, hit so hard by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, towns wrecked three years ago barely escaped...

Next-gen catamarans for science

New aluminum twin hulls extending scientists’ range on the water Fast, lightweight aluminum catamarans are making the passenger ferry business more competitive. Universities and research institutions see the advantages too, and their latest newbuilds are moving the multihull concept forward. Catamarans as research platforms have been around for a long time. The 96’x40’x7’ F.G. Walton Smith, named for the founder of the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric...

Offshore wind gets some breathing space

Five-year tax credit could help wind ventures. Everyone is still talking about the oil industry’s big win repealing the 40-year ban on petroleum exports, and the first shipment out of Corpus Christi, Texas, on New Year’s Eve. Meanwhile, would-be offshore wind energy producers were quietly toasting their part of the energy policy compromise that came out of Congress in December, including a five-year extension of tax credits for building wind power plants. “It is a great help. It’s been...

LNG: Training for new fuel realities

Are regulatory agencies keeping up with LNG technology?   The momentum of liquefied natural gas as a maritime fuel is accelerating, slowed only a little by the present petroleum glut and low prices for traditional oil fuels. Operators and safety groups are busy preparing mariners for day-to-day LNG operations. That process was covered in sessions at the Dec. 1-3 International WorkBoat Show in New Orleans, and a week later the Coast Guard hosted a major LNG conference for industry...

The maritime millennials

New blood will fill the industry’s “demographic hole” You hear a lot of media chatter these days about the millennials, the last generation born in the latter 20th century. Most of it is marketing – a relentless drive to somehow wring more money out of young people who came up in an era of stagnant wages and the worst economic downturn in 70 years. But in the maritime trades, the talk among management and labor is about how to give millennials money – recruiting them to an industry...

Scrutiny over port air pollution

The workboat industry has a role to play in the next phase of pollution reduction and expanded energy efficiency. Northeast harbors have long-held reputations as pollution hotspots owing to their industrial history, with sediments steeped for decades in toxins and trace chemicals. There are longstanding public health advisories warning against eating fish and crabs out of the New York-New Jersey harbor complex, with its burden of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dioxin – a...

The struggle for South Street

New York’s first – and last -- maritime neighborhood hangs on. A few stories above the crowd milling around Manhattan's Pier 16, ironworkers called out and clanged steel as the Fire Department City of New York prepared to christen its new fireboat. The 66’ William M. Feehan will be stationed on the East River, ready to respond to any emergency along the redeveloping waterfront of lower Manhattan. How that neighborhood will finally take shape – and its relationship to the river that...

Energy evolution crowds Northeast waters

LNG port veto highlights conflicts New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s move to pull the plug on the Port Ambrose offshore liquefied natural gas terminal could be a harbinger for zoning the ocean – divvying up sectors of the nearshore Exclusive Economic Zone, much in the way urban planners set aside land uses. The preferred term among professionals is “marine spatial planning,” touted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as “a science-based tool that regions can use to...

Autonomous ships meet a skeptical audience

New age of “ship intelligence” the talk at SNAME conference It’s been a fact for decades that as commercial vessels get bigger, crews get smaller – a trend driven by both technology and economics. But if futurists in the maritime industry are right, the next leap forward is coming, and it will cut crew size even further. “We are now at the dawn here of a ship intelligence era…It’s coming. It’s coming quickly,” Oskar Levander, vice president of marine innovation for Rolls-Royce...