Kirk MooreKirk Moore
Associate Editor Kirk Moore was a reporter for the Asbury Park Press for over 30 years before joining WorkBoat in 2015. He wrote several award-winning stories on marine, environmental, coastal and military issues that helped drive federal and state government policy changes. He has also been a field editor for WorkBoat’s sister publication, National Fisherman, for almost 25 years. Moore was awarded the Online News Association 2011 Knight Award for Public Service for the “Barnegat Bay Under Stress,” 2010 series that led to the New Jersey state government’s restoration plan. He lives in West Creek, N.J.

Blog Activity

Blog Activity

When a ferry is a houseboat

Ferries don't just connect commuters — they actually spur housing and other development. As heavy industries began to trickle away from the New York and New Jersey waterfront in the mid-20th century, they left behind vast swathes of vacant land and rotting piers. It stayed that way for many decades, with good reason – the sheer expense of clearing the land, complicated by pollution that preceded environmental laws of the 1970s. Toxic brews bubbled in backwaters, and the very air in...

Wanted: Bigger, stronger tugs

More muscle is needed for escort and assist work in post-Panamax ports. American ports have been spending big to prepare for the Panama Canal widening, and oncoming fleets of post-Panamax containerships. As that trade grows, more money could be landing in shipyards, to build a new generation of tugboats. Jensen Maritime recently unveiled its design for a 100’x40’, 6,770 hp tug that will combine the nimble performance of harbor tugs with oceangoing capabilities, and the power to assist...

Lasers dazzle danger

Don’t lase me, bro! While a Coast Guard helicopter crew was winching an injured woman off an old sugar pier on Aguadilla Bay in Puerto Rico April 25, aircraft commander Lt. Hunter Blue could not believe someone on the ground was flashing them with a laser beam. It was the third time helicopters had been lit up over the same area, the Coast Guard said. Fools with cheap pocket laser pointers have been harassing pilots for a long time, despite federal law that can fine them up to $250,000...

Groups reject barge plan for Ellis Island flats

Scuffle over barge mooring location highlights New York Harbor politics.   In a crowded New York Harbor, New York State Marine Highway Transportation, based in Troy, N.Y., was looking for spots to moor a few barges. It very rapidly devolved into the classic local dialect response: “Fuhgeddaboudit.” Three of the four proposed locations were near Cohoes on the upper Hudson River, the Bay Ridge Flats near Brooklyn and in Jamaica Bay. The fourth, on the harbor flats near New Jersey,...

NY Waterway marks birth of private ferry revival

A New York ferry operator marks 30 years, but the anniversary has significance beyond the company. Ferry operator NY Waterway put out a low-key media release the other day, promoting its recent $17 million investments in new boats, re-powering projects and other spending to help customers commute between New York and New Jersey. In a few weeks the company will commission the Betsy Ross, sistership of the Molly Pitcher, a pair of fast aluminum catamarans delivered by Yank Marine,...

In Jones Act battle, it's national security vs. free trade

Warring ideologies highlight conflict over Jones Act. Sooner or later, it had to come to this: the Jones Act debate as a wrestling match between two dominating political forces in Washington. In one corner, national security, the 800-lb. gorilla that has loomed over national discourse for 15 years now. The challenger: free trade, the bipartisan faith that lowering U.S. regulations and trade barriers will, on balance, benefit all Americans. Both are invoked amid renewed demands for...

South Street Seaport loses an original patron

The death of South Street Seaport Museum founder Peter Stanford comes at a key moment for the institution. With its fabled fish market long gone, battered by the great recession and then Hurricane Sandy, New York’s South Sea Seaport at times has looked like a throwback to the city’s bad old days, when the 1960s oxymoron of “urban renewal” threatened to destroy Manhattan’s maritime heritage. But back then was when Peter Stanford appeared. Brooklyn-born, a lifelong small-boat sailor who...

Floating turbine plans light up West Coast wind prospects

Newly announced Pacific projects prove that interest in wind power is undeniable. With momentum slowly building toward bigger wind energy plans for the Atlantic continental shelf, proponents of floating turbines have their first proposals in for tackling wind-rich areas in Pacific deep water. The latest is Trident Winds’ Morro Bay project, a nearly 68,000-acre area 20 to 30 miles off the California coast that would generate up to 800 megawatts from 100 turbines on floating foundations,...

The politics of Atlantic drilling

Even if low oil prices didn't factor into the decision to bar Atlantic drilling, an increase might bring the topic back to the fore. In April 2009, the new Obama administration was looking at the expiration date for a moratorium on oil and gas exploration off the East Coast. Then-Interior Secretary Ken Salazar talked optimistically of developing wind energy out there – and allowed that the administration was very interested in those hydrocarbons too, after winning an election amid high...

Small grants could be big for harbor air quality

Modest cooperation and cost-sharing between government and industry can make a major difference. The Clean Air Act has made it so 1960s smog emergencies in U.S. cities are a faint memory. But hotspots remain, and port city neighborhoods are among them. A new report from the U.S. Maritime Administration points to one way modest cooperation and cost-sharing between government and industry could help. A $400,000 grant from Marad to the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency in Washington State...