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Lake Michigan-Huron at all-time low

2/7/2013

DETROIT - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Detroit District reported a preliminary new record low water level for Lake Michigan-Huron. The new record low of 175.57 meters, or 576.02', is not only the lowest January monthly average water level ever recorded, but also the lowest monthly average ever recorded for any month over the official period of record for Great Lakes water levels, which extends back to 1918. The Corps latest forecasts indicate a strong likelihood for continued record lows on Lake Michigan-Huron over the next several months. Water levels on the remaining Great Lakes are expected to remain below their respective long-term average water levels, but above record lows.

“Not only have water levels on Michigan-Huron broken records the past two months, but they have been very near record lows for the last several months before then. Lake Michigan-Huron’s water levels have also been below average for the past 14 years, which is the longest period of sustained below average levels since 1918 for that lake,” John Allis, chief of the Great Lakes Hydraulics and Hydrology Office at the Corps, the office that monitors Great Lakes water levels, said in a prepared statement.

In this report from UpNorth News, you can see how locals are being affected, as well as hear from Durocher Marine, out of Sheboygan, Wis., who said that with the increased difficulties also comes new work opportunities:

 

The current record low water levels on Lake Michigan-Huron, the Corps reported, are the result of lower than average snowfall during the winter of 2011-2012, coupled with the very hot and dry summer. Together these conditions led to only a 4 inch seasonal rise of Lake Michigan-Huron in 2012, compared to an average rise of 12 inches. Also, evaporation was significantly above average during the summer and fall months and contributed to a very rapid seasonal decline.

Above average precipitation and snow cover coupled with below average evaporation this winter are needed to raise Lake Michigan-Huron water levels above record lows. However, it would take similar conditions over many seasons for levels to rise to near average levels.

2/8/2013 1:48:35 PM PETER LINDQUIST says:
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Mother Nature is firmly in charge of climate change, not man. We do need to squeeze up the St Clair outflow to help restore the lower lake levels.
2/7/2013 3:36:09 PM Wayne Anderson says:
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Well, it looks as if climate change is starting to directly affect the lake front crowd. Unless the pocket book gets pinched, nobody takes this thing seriously. However climate change also makes money for some which translates to higher costs for all the consumers down the line. Don't like what is happening now... just wait it will get worse.

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